Blog

Viewing posts for the category linux

World of Warcraft in Linux using Wine

Many manuals of installing and using World of Warcraft (or simply WoW) in Linux using Wine (Windows emulation) are outdated and provide lots of complex instructions for old Wine version. The truth is very simple:


  1. Take a recent Wine version. Any version from this year (2007) will do. Debian and Ubuntu users can either use the wine from the latest releases of the distros or use the winehq.org repositories.

  2. Install WoW via the usual installer

  3. Edit $WOW/WTF/Config.wtf and add following lines:

    SET gxApi "OpenGL"
    SET SoundOutputSystem "1"
    SET SoundBufferSize "100"

  4. Run 'wine regedit' and set HKEY_CURRENT_USER->Software->Wine->OpenGL->DisabledExtensions to "GL_ARB_vertex_buffer_object" (you will need to create this string value)

Home folder organisation

After last post about a FHS amendment to address the structure of user's home folders, I received a lot of comments and there is one very significant thing that can be changed in the proposal - instead of having $HOME/{.data|.cache|.config}/appname structure, to change that to a mandatory $HOME/.library/appname/{cache|config|...} . This version still has all the benefits of the first solution (configuration for an application can be easily identified and erase, and all cache can easily be excluded from backups using "$HOME/.library/*/cache" regexp) and also has additional benefits, main of which is the ability to later introduce the concept of user installed packages. The idea is that it would be possible to support having /bin, /lib and /share subdirectories in these application directories thus making an ability for the whole application to e packed in a single directory and allowing the application to be installed simply by unpacking this directory. I admit that much of this is glanced over from MacOS X world, but I do not think that it diminishes the idea itself.
Some problems appear there - support of these distributed bin folders, support of separate lib folders, handling of application plugins, handling of dependencies, handling of the application menu, upgrading notifications for the user software vs. system software. But nothing there that can not be solved. I feel that this can bring together FHS and LSB by providing something of an API for software being installed by users. Having no registry of the software in this solution allows for some interesting things, for example having multiple versions of one program just by renaming the application folder.
A lot of specification work is required here, therefore I proposed a workshop on this topic in Debconf7. I hope to have something that everyone can agree on and maybe even some code by then, so that after Debconf7 there can be a formal policy amendment proposal.

FHS extension for user home folders

Justification.


Currently there is a huge mess of files and folders that start with a "." in any users home folder. There is no structure or policy on how applications should choose file and folder names for data that needs to be stored in users home directory. Additionally there is no established consistency between Gnome, KDE and most other applications. Gnome application have part of their configuration information in gconf folder and other part in a gnome subfolder. KDE applications have a complex structure under .kde/. And most other applications either have one file directly in users home folder or have their own dot-folder there.

TUX Magazine Issue 13 review

TUX Magazine #11

Start with a killer

To start the blog not with an obligatory 'Let's start this' post, but with something worth reading, I want to present the mighty nildience (null audience) the best Linux audio playing app: Amarok.

  1. Collection of your music based on the top directory - i.e. you just say 'my music is in /home/aigarius/mp3' and it rebrowses that dir each time it starts to find new music.
  2. Automatic rating based on play/skip ratio - just listen to what you like and skip songs you don't like and soon Amarok will be able to tell the difference.
  3. Get lyrics in 1 or 2 clicks - I love this feature.
  4. Control the player regardless of your current app - shortcuts with 'Windows' key work everywhere.
  5. Very nice playlist management within your music collection.
  6. Least played songs - either to try something long forgotten or to free your hard drive.
These are the features I like the best about Amarok. Please comment on what you like to find in your audio player.

Recent Posts

Archive

2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005

Categories

Authors

Feeds

RSS / Atom